Thank you so much to NetGalley for a review copy of What Kind of Girl. This doesn’t affect my review whatsoever.

TRIGGER WARNING: EATING DISORDER, ABUSE, SELF HARM

Image result for what kind of girl book

Girl In Pieces meets Moxie in this unflinching exploration of the many forms of abuse society inflicts upon women, and the strength it takes to rise above it all to claim your worth.

The girls at North Bay Academy are taking sides. It all started when Mike Parker’s girlfriend showed up with a bruise on her face. Or, more specifically, when she walked into the principal’s office and said Mike hit her. But the students have questions. Why did she go to the principal and not the polcie? Why did she stay so long if he was hurting her? Obviously, if it’s true, Mike should be expelled. But is it true?

Some girls want to rally for his expulsion—and some want to rally around Mike. The only thing that the entire student body can agree on? Someone is lying. And the truth has to come out.

The story starts with Maya going to her school principal to tell her that golden boy, Mike Parker, has been hitting her. It has different perspectives, Maya and Junie, the best friend. Maya’s sections have different voices, The Popular Girl and The Girlfriend, which were confusing. The section titled The Burnout was also perplexing to read.

Although the characters’ voices are vastly different, it was still a struggle to figure out whose point of view I was reading. This story explores the aftermath of domestic abuse, anxiety and eating disorders. The readers become aware of all the self-doubt, the confusion, the self-blame and minimising the seriousness of the abuse.

What Kind of Girl is an important read but personally, I just couldn’t get into it at all. I skipped to the end after reading up to 47% of it — the ending was deep, it was an emotional part of the book and referred back to the abuse and how Maya dealt with it.

Even though I wasn’t a fan of the writing style, I do think this book should be read by everyone so they are aware of the impacts of abuse and how eating disorders and anxiety manifests and affects our lives. Despite the seriousness of the story and how I liked the lessons within it, I rate it 3 stars because it was a bit of a disappointment for me and the flow of it was too confusing and choppy.

Sumaiya, x

Posted by:Sumaiya Ahmed

Sumaiya Ahmed is a student, poet and freelance features journalist, aiming to break down the boundaries of cultural stigma and shame attached to mental health and sexuality within the South Asian culture, and bringing marginalised topics to light. She is the Founder and Editor-In-Chief of Poised.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s