thank you so much to NetGalley & Penguin Random House for sending me an e-book of FULL DISCLOSURE to review. this does not affect my rating.

Image result for full disclosure camryn garrett

In a community that isn’t always understanding, an HIV-positive teen must navigate fear, disclosure, and radical self-acceptance when she falls in love–and lust–for the first time. Powerful and uplifting, Full Disclosure will speak to fans of Angie Thomas and Nicola Yoon.

Simone Garcia-Hampton is starting over at a new school, and this time things will be different. She’s making real friends, making a name for herself as student director of Rent, and making a play for Miles, the guy who makes her melt every time he walks into a room. The last thing she wants is for word to get out that she’s HIV-positive, because last time . . . well, last time things got ugly.

Keeping her viral load under control is easy, but keeping her diagnosis under wraps is not so simple. As Simone and Miles start going out for real–shy kisses escalating into much more–she feels an uneasiness that goes beyond butterflies. She knows she has to tell him that she’s positive, especially if sex is a possibility, but she’s terrified of how he’ll react! And then she finds an anonymous note in her locker: I know you have HIV. You have until Thanksgiving to stop hanging out with Miles. Or everyone else will know too.

Simone’s first instinct is to protect her secret at all costs, but as she gains a deeper understanding of the prejudice and fear in her community, she begins to wonder if the only way to rise above is to face the haters head-on . . .

well, FULL DISCLOSURE wasn’t entirely what i expected.

it was like a storm brewing with the sun crawling up, followed by a pretty rainbow at the end. this book was slightly reminiscent of LOVE, SIMON in some ways — including a kinda shitty person forcing a character to come out. like, why do some people just love to assume another person’s sexuality or think they know everything?

at first, i wasn’t a huge fan of the book, it was great and all, but i could feel myself getting a little bored and found some of it a little repetitive. Simone, as much as i like her as a character, felt a little bit annoying. but towards the latter half of the novel, i actually began to enjoy it, and i adored all the jokes. it was hilarious, in a way no book has been before.

the innuendos and sex jokes were awesome.

it’s a heartfelt book, that i thoroughly recommend and will definitely read again. the relationship Simone has with her dads is so lovely and wholesome; i love how close she is to them, but i do feel like her brother could’ve perhaps been mentioned a little bit more. it felt almost like he was just there as a plot device, to move the story another way. which could have been intentional, but it was just a bit . . . ehhh, to me.

but what i definitely loved about FULL DISCLOSURE is that it touched on racism, queerness, sex, masturbation and sex education/sexual health. it was discussed quite a lot, and some of it, the scene in the sex toy shop in particular, was even funny, despite how important these topics are.

i also wasn’t a huge fan of Claudia. like, at all.

by the end of the book, i quite liked FULL DISCLOSURE and found it adorable and touching. Simone’s development as a character, realising she was wrong to ditch her friends the moment she got a boyfriend (NEVER do that — boys come and go, but your friends are the ones who help you to pick up the pieces!), was one that i was glad to come across.

i’d say this book is 3.5 stars, just because of how funny it was and how important the talks that took place are. i loved the storyline and how it opens up a wider discussion, into HIV and gives a deeper insight into it, as we so rarely (if ever) get books to do with a character who has HIV.

have you read FULL DISCLOSURE? what did you think?

Sumaiya, x

Posted by:Sumaiya Ahmed

Sumaiya Ahmed is a student, poet and freelance features journalist, aiming to break down the boundaries of cultural stigma and shame attached to mental health and sexuality within the South Asian culture, and bringing marginalised topics to light. She is the Founder and Editor-In-Chief of Poised.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s