thank you NetGalley & MIRA for an e-book of GOOD GIRLS LIE to review — this does not affect my rating or review in any way.

TRIGGER WARNING: ABUSE, MURDER, BLOOD, DRUG USE, MENTION OF RAPE

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Goode girls don’t lie…

Perched atop a hill in the tiny town of Marchburg, Virginia, The Goode School is a prestigious prep school known as a Silent Ivy. The boarding school of choice for daughters of the rich and influential, it accepts only the best and the brightest. Its elite status, long-held traditions and honor code are ideal for preparing exceptional young women for brilliant futures at Ivy League universities and beyond. But a stranger has come to Goode, and this ivy has turned poisonous.

In a world where appearances are everything, as long as students pretend to follow the rules, no one questions the cruelties of the secret societies or the dubious behavior of the privileged young women who expect to get away with murder. But when a popular student is found dead, the truth cannot be ignored. Rumors suggest she was struggling with a secret that drove her to suicide.

But look closely . . . because there are truths and there are lies, and then there is everything that really happened.

when i first read what this book was about, i just knew i had to read it.

an all-girls boarding school? a murder? a mystery? secrets and lies? count me the fuck in.

from the very first chapter, i was completely hooked, albeit slightly confused. it seemed almost as if there were two different point of views at first, or we were looking at the past and then coming back to present day.

this, obviously, was intentional. and it was good.

every word gripped me; i was on the edge of my seat as i read on.

the mystery slowly began to unravel, but as it did it left me with more questions. at first i had my suspicions but i soon came to realise it would be too easy if it was this particular character, so there was no way it could be them doing all these things.

what i loved about GOOD GIRLS LIE is that the narrator is unreliable, so it makes us wonder just how much we can trust her and her version of events. it leaves it up to the reader to come up with explanations for what’s going on and what went on and what would happen.

and if you thought Daddy was bad, just wait until you understood what the rest of your life was going to look like, on your back or on your knees, being forced, getting pregnant, and good luck getting through the birth of the first

the topics of misogyny, sexism, and abusive relationships is explored throughout the novel, as well as sexuality and acceptance.

“female rebellion is a time-honoured tradition, yes, but it’s usually more genteel now, death by a thousand cuts.”

at some point during the book, i did begin to get a new suspicion of what was happening, although it was exciting to see everything unfold slowly and piece it together. in the end, i was relieved — and a little disappointed — to realise that i was right, because it meant that it was predictable.

despite the predictability of the book, i very much enjoyed reading it and it was a fun mystery to get through. i’d say it’s perhaps 4 stars, instead of the original 3.5 i would’ve given it, just because of the execution of the plot, the topics mentioned and because, well, it’s Christmas.

and speaking of, i wish you guys a super merry christmas, happy holidays, and i hope you have a lovely time with your loved ones! 🎄

Sumaiya, x

Posted by:Sumaiya Ahmed

Sumaiya Ahmed is a student, poet and freelance features journalist, aiming to break down the boundaries of cultural stigma and shame attached to mental health and sexuality within the South Asian culture, and bringing marginalised topics to light. She is the Founder and Editor-In-Chief of Poised.

2 thoughts on “Good Girls Lie

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