hey lovelies!

hope everyone’s had, or having, a good day, despite the awful weather. this is another little food review, since i’ve been in a bit of a reading slump lately.

yesterday i went for brunch with J, as i was craving some breakfast foods, and figured why not go to a place that’s famous for it?? so i picked Polo Bar, which is open 24 hours, in the centre of Liverpool Street. (it’s right opposite the station!)

i’d reserved a table for us for 12pm. bare in mind it does get quite packed. we were shown to a table straight away. for such a big and popular restaurant, it’s fucking tiny and cramped. we were practically on top of the other diners.

it was an extremely narrow corridor to the tables, and we were seated at a small small table in between two booths, as there were just two of us. but there were two people at the other booth. so perhaps . . . racism?

J wasn’t a huge fan of the place when we entered, found it to be tacky and rundown. the posters looked a million years old and worn, the floors were dirty and sticky, the tables looked old too. everything was just . . . not particularly pleasing to the eye, to be frank.

despite the cramped and close quarters of the place, i didn’t feel uncomfortable or as if anyone was staring at me. i was actually in quite a good mood!

we both ordered the American Pancakes, which came with maple syrup, 2 fried eggs, mushrooms, hash brown, bacon and a sausage, and cajun sweet potato chips, and it cost £10.50 per person. J got a cappuccino (£2.80) and i got a hot chocolate (£3).

the drinks and food arrived promptly which was good. the customer service was decent, i’d say. nothing exceptional or amazing.

look at the shit art

can i just ask . . . WHO THE FUCK GIVES HOT CHOCOLATE IN A GLASS AND NOT A MUG? fam tf is this shit!

absolutely abysmal. at least it tasted nice. but again, i call racism.

there was another asian woman who sat on the booth beside us with her white partner, and she was given a mocha in a glass too, whilst her partner got his drink in a mug. what weirdos, honestly.

the food arrived a few minutes after the drinks.

so J said it was all quite cold when he ate it. (how do men just scoff their food down btw? they all just demolish it within seconds. and it’s not even just my man. the dude at the booth next to ours finished his food within five minutes too. like . . . huh????) he did enjoy his food, he liked it but said it could’ve defo been done better. the tomato was just ugly and unnecessary there, especially as it was just one lmao.

the sweet potato fries were cold but tasted nice. he said the bacon tasted as if it had been made 45 minutes prior and it was way too dry, which i agree with. it was the shittiest bacon i’ve had.

i found that i liked the sweet potato chips and pancake most on the plate, but even then to say i liked it would be a bit of a stretch. it just wasn’t as shitty as everything else was. and the thing is, i feel like this place had potential or that it is good—but it just wasn’t for me. maybe if i’d picked something else off the menu, i would’ve enjoyed it more idk?

everything, when i ate it, was just cold. i actually can’t get over how dry and awful the bacon was. how hard is it to make bacon nice??? the hash brown was decent though, methinks. the syrup was also nice.

i’m in two minds about whether i’d go back, because apparently their red velvet pancake stack is really good and costs only £15. which is, you know, not bad. but i really just don’t want to be like errrrr it’s shit. although i’m leaning more towards not going again.

the food wasn’t god-awful, and it definitely would’ve been more enjoyable had everything been piping hot. but i wouldn’t recommend Polo Bar and yeah, as much as i want to try the red velvet pancakes, nah, i wouldn’t go back. the cramped seating isn’t worth it, having people bump into us on the way to their table was annoying as fuck.

it’s probably like a 1.75 out of 5 stars for me ngl. maybe a 2.

but that’s just a maybe.

Sumaiya, x

Posted by:Sumaiya Ahmed

Sumaiya Ahmed is a student, poet and freelance features journalist, aiming to break down the boundaries of cultural stigma and shame attached to mental health and sexuality within the South Asian culture, and bringing marginalised topics to light. She is the Founder and Editor-In-Chief of Poised.

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