Having Books As Friends Doesn’t Make You Weird

Because books have the power to change your life, teach you lessons and inspire you

[This is a snippet from my article for A Thousand Lives.]

With your back against the plush chair and your legs crossed beneath you, the soft murmurs from the other students in the library, and a gentle noise in the background, you finally open up to the first page of that book. Finally. Your break times and lunchtimes are usually spent the same way: holed up in the library, devouring book after book.

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The girls in your class think it’s a bit weird how you read so much and make fun of you for being a bookworm, but you chuckle to yourself. That’s exactly what you are! You recall the first time you fell in love with reading: finding a piece of your heart nestled between the pages of each story you stumbled into.

But as time goes by, a part of you might wish to have someone — maybe a friend who can actually reply to you — in your life. Someone that’s a real, breathing person; not a witch or a mermaid or a hero or a demi-god. Not a boy you find yourself relating to, wallflowers and brownies and all. It’s not an overpowering feeling and passes just as quickly as it comes, because truthfully, in books, you’re happier anyway.

Continue reading on A Thousand Lives . . .

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If you enjoy my writing, feel free to support my work via Paypal or buy me a digital Ko-Fi. If you’d like to commission me for any work, please check out my portfolio.

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Published by Sumaiya Ahmed

Sumaiya Ahmed is a Muslim student, poet and freelance features journalist, aiming to break down the boundaries of cultural stigma and shame attached to mental health and sexuality within the South Asian culture, and bringing marginalised topics to light.

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